Tecnifibre British Junior Open 2009 02-06 January, Sheffield    

  TODAY Day FOUR Day THREE Day TWO Day ONE


Tue 6th Jan, Day FIVE, FINALS:

G13  Yathreb Adel (Egy) bt Salma Hani (Egy)
               11/7, 11/8, 3/11, 11/8 (39m)
B13  Amr Aboul Souad (Egy) bt Kush Kumar (Ind)
              11/7, 7/11, 9/11, 11/9, 11/7 (41m)

G15  Nour El Sherbeny (Egy) bt Kanzy El Defrawy (Egy)
              11/6, 11/6, 10/12, 4/11, 11/4 (42m)
B15  Mahesh Mangaonkar (Ind) bt Oliver Holland (Eng)
               11/5, 7/11, 11/5, 12/10 (40m)

G17  Nour El Tayeb (Egy) bt Nouran El Torky (Egy)
               12/10, 11/8, 11/6 (24m)
B17  Amr Khalid Khalifa (Egy) bt Danish Atlas Khan (Pak)
               11/5, 11/3, 14/12 (40m)

G19  Wee Wern Low (Mas) bt Dipika Pallikal (Ind)
               11/2, 11/8, 8/11, 11/8 (42m)
B19  Mohamed El Shorbagy (Egy) bt Ivan Yuen (Mas)  
               11/8, 11/7, 13/11 (33m)


GALLERIES

 
Draws & Results

Mohamed El Shorbagy (Egy) bt Ivan Yuen (Mas)  
               11/8, 11/7, 13/11 (33m)

It's Shorbagy Again

Considering what he's achieved since taking the BJO U19 title here last year - as a 16-year-old - it's not really a surprise that Mohamed El Shorgagy has retained the title today in Sheffield.

He's been tested though - he could easily have lost his semi-final yesterday, and although he was well on top for the first two games against Ivan Yuen, the Malaysian staged a stirring recovery in the third, making it much tougher for the world junior champion, and earning himself four game-balls at 10/6.

Perhaps mindful of yesterday's experience, Shorbagy dug in, produced some determined retrieving and clawed his way back to equality. This was what he himself calls an "English game", no flashy winners, nice and steady.

Ivan got one more opportunity, lost it on a stroke, then tinned after a final long rally to give Shorbagy match ball. It was an anti-climatic end as Ivan clean missed the service and spun around to see the ball die in the back.

An undramatic finish, and no great show of emotion from Shorbagy this time. Mission achieved, now he aims for number three in 2010 ...
 

G19  Wee Wern Low (Mas) bt Dipika Pallikal (Ind)
               11/2, 11/8, 8/11, 11/8 (42m)

It's Wee Wern at last

It was her third appearance in a final, and her last, and Low Wee Wern finally has a BJO title to her name.

In the early stages it looked as though it would be a comfortable victory, with Dipika Pallikal, last year's U17 champion, misfiring. Dipika's game often features lots of winners, and sometimes errors too, and they were prevalent in the opening game.

From then on though it was a pretty even contest, Dipika more eager to finish the rally than the Malaysian, but willing to engage in some long, punishing affairs too when needed. The Indian was winning points with her returns of serve - boasted or volleyed into the opposite front corner nick, but was missing a few too.

Wee Wern took the second, moving clear from 8-all, but Dipika opened and maintained a small gap throughout the third. The fourth was level pegging, but from 6-all Wee Wern put in three winners, then moved to match-ball 10-7 on a stroke.

Dipika saved the first with one of those service return boasts, but Wee Wern returned the favour with a dying boast of her own on the next rally and the long wait was over ... just in time.

"She wasn't really there in the first," said the new champion, "that one was pretty easy. But she came back strongly in the second, then I made a few errors at the start of the third so she took that. "I'm feeling a bit of excitement at winning and a bit of relief that I've won one, at last!"

B17  Amr Khalid Khalifa (Egy) bt Danish Atlas Khan (Pak)
               11/5, 11/3, 14/12 (40m)

Khalifi mainly in control

Two years on from winning the U15 title, Amr Khalid Khalifa duly claimed the U17 tit
le with an impressive display in the final to deny Pakistan its one remaining chance of a 2009 title.

Khalifa had the match pretty well under control in the first two games. The players were fairly evenly matched, but the Egyptian just seemed to have a bit more power, a bit more control, and his extra height and reach was a factor too.

But Danish fought back well, recovering from a 4/1 deficit in the third make it tough for Khalifa, and it developed into a real, close contest. He earned himself a couple of game balls, and should have taken the second one, tinning at the front of the court with his opponent stranded.



After a long, patient rally Khalifa missed a long dropshot - one of very few unforced errors he made today - to give Danish another chance, but saved it. On his first match ball, after another long rally, the Egyptian put in a volley drop, the Pakistani was denied a let he felt he deserved, and another title was heading to Egypt.
 

G17  Nour El Tayeb (Egy) bt Nouran El Torky (Egy)
               12/10, 11/8, 11/6 (24m)

Nour makes it three

Nour El Tayeb, who won the U15 title in 2008 and the U13 crown in 2005, started the event as hot favourite, and maintained her record of not dropping a game, but Nouran El Torky gave her a hard time on the way.

Nour opened up a 9/6 lead in the first, but Nouran, a smaller version of her elder sister Heba but just as fast and determined, pulled it back and earned a game ball at 10/9. Nour has claimed some notable scapls on the WISPA tour recently though, and that experience no doubt helped her to avert the danger as she took the game 12/10.

An 8/3 lead in the second evaporated too, as Nouran fought her way back to parity at 8-all, but again the top seed found what was necessary to win the game.

In the third too, 6/3 became 6-all, but Nouran's challenge finally ran out of steam as Nour claimed the last few points and a third title.
  

B15  Mahesh Mangaonkar (Ind) bt Oliver Holland (Eng)
               11/5, 7/11, 11/5, 12/10 (40m)

Indian delight as Holland  denied

In a high-quality match India claimed their first Boys BJO title since Saurav Ghosal took the U19 title in 2004.

Iliver Holland was England's first boys finalist for three years and he contributed equally to a match of high quality, both players moving and hitting superbly. In the final analysis it was probably Holland's higher unforced error count that made the difference, but that difference was marginal.

After losing the first, Holland moved clear from the middle of the second to level matters. Mangaonkar's steadier play was enough to see him take the third and regain the lead, but Holland fought back again in the fourth, moving clear from 7-all to earn three game balls.

The first was lost as the Indian played an inch-perfect boast, the second on an unforced error, and the third after a huge, huge rally, Holland's boast just clipping the tin.

The momentum with him, Mangaonkar played another precise boast to reach match ball, then finished off another lung-busting rally with a leaping volley kill ... a fitting end to a fine match.
 

G15  Nour El Sherbeny (Egy) bt Kanzy El Defrawy (Egy)
              11/6, 11/6, 10/12, 4/11, 11/4 (42m)

Three in a row for Sherbeny

After looking well in control for two and a half games, Nour El Sherbeny looked to have lost the chance of an Under 15 title to go with her Under 13 wins in the last two years.

Seeded two to compatriot Kanzy El Defrawy, Sherbeny took the first two games with something to spare - the usually fiery Defrawy was a little subdued.

7/3 up in the third, the hat-trick looked assure, but Kanzy started to fight back, started playing with real determination, got to 10 first and took the game on extra points.

The top seed really started to get on top as she cruised through the fourth, and Nour was definitely not happy as she came off court to prepare for the decider. But a talking to from her father appeared to do the trick and she was back in dominant mood from the start of the fifth.

The final point was a stroke, no great celebrations but a lot of relief from the Sherbeny corner as she came off court a triple champion ...

 B13  Amr Aboul Souad (Egy) bt Kush Kumar (Ind)
              11/7, 7/11, 9/11, 11/9, 11/7 (41m)

First blood to Egypt

Egypt claimed the first title on finals day - it won't be their last - when Amr Aboul Souad triumphed in an exciting Boys U13 final that had the masses of Indian and Egyptian supporters screaming and shouting for all they were worth.

Kush Kumar, winner of last week's Scottish title, started the better in the first four games - he led the first 7/3 but lost it 7/11, led the second 7/3 but held on to take it 11/9, did exactly the same in the third, and earned yet another 7/3 lead in the fourth only to lose that one 11/9 as well!

However it was the Egyptian who started the decider the better, opening up a 4/1 lead and maintaining the gap until the final shot ... whereupon Abbeydale's court seven exploded ...

TODAY Day FOUR Day THREE Day TWO Day ONE

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